News Update on Career Progression Research: Jan – 2020

All the right stuff: A comparison of female and male managers’ career progression.

Examined the career progression of male and feminine managers employed by 20 Fortune 500 corporations. All study participants had been geographically transferred for career advancement during the two yrs preceding the study. Nevertheless, the ladies lagged behind the lads with reference to salary progression and frequency of job transfers. Although the ladies had done “all the proper stuff” (getting an identical education because the men, maintaining similar levels of family power, working in similar industries, not occupation and out of the manpower , not removing their names from consideration for a transfer more often) it had been still not enough. there have been still significant disparities in men’s and women’s salary progression and geographic mobility. [1]

Stretchwork: Managing the Career Progression Paradox in External Labor Markets

Changes employed relationships have diminished the degree to which internal labor markets shape careers. Using comparative field studies, we examine how contract workers attempt to achieve career progression without the advantage of organizational guidance. Specifically, we examine how contract workers manage the career progression paradox: the matter of finding employment without prior experience. “Stretchwork” bridging from proven competencies to new ones helps reconcile this paradox. We identify four tactics wont to acquire stretchwork, explore the conditions affecting the success of these tactics, and offer theoretical implications for career progression in external labor markets. [2]

Scientific Mobility, Career Progression, and Excellence in the European Research Area 1

This paper explores the varied aspects of mobility requirements and therefore the relationship between competitiveness, excellence, and mobility in research project within the European Union (EU). The “expectation of mobility” in science plays a crucial role in shaping the ecu Research Area. Research argues that better economic opportunities and advanced migration policy in destination countries promote highly skilled migration. Empirical evidence shows that academics and researchers consider important determinants within the migration decision and destination to be the research environment and conditions, i.e. research support, infrastructures, demand for research and development (R&D) staff, and academics (Millard, 2005). While it are often argued that the ecu Research Area is meant to encourage the interchange of scientists, skills balance is important to competitiveness within the European region. [3]

What do postdocs need to succeed? A survey of current standing and future directions for Australian researchers

When discussing the postdoctoral period during a researcher’s life, a scarcity of career progression often boils right down to “is it you, or is it me?” Is it a discount within the quality of candidates, or the very fact that there are now too many candidates for a rapidly shrinking pool of jobs? Australia provides a perfect case study, as an outsized and decentralized country with a government mandate to create the STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine) workforce. The goal of this study was 1) to supply a baseline for postdoctoral experiences and career aspirations in Australia, and 2) to spot gaps in postdoctoral training. [4]

Socio-cultural Career Progression Barriers for Women in Academics: A Case of the Federal College of Education (Special) Oyo, Nigeria

Gender challenges in career remains a deterrent to career progression and has largely affected the feminine population within the workplace environment. In Nigerian society, women have a quite significant socio-cultural role. This study, therefore, examined the understandings of girls academics on the cultural family issues that function barriers to their careers. The study may be a contribution to the prevailing literature on women academics’ career experiences which are less investigated in developing countries compared to the developed ones. In doing this, the study tried to supply explanations to the impact of cultural family roles of girls in achieving progression in their careers, using the Federal College of Education (Special) Oyo, Nigeria as a case. The study utilized a mixed research approach to research this relationship. [5]

Reference

[1] Stroh, L.K., Brett, J.M. and Reilly, A.H., 1992. All the right stuff: A comparison of female and male managers’ career progression. Journal of applied psychology, 77(3), (Web Link)

[2] O’Mahony, S. and Bechky, B.A., 2006. Stretchwork: Managing the career progression paradox in external labor markets. Academy of Management Journal, 49(5), (Web Link)

[3] Morano‐Foadi, S., 2005. Scientific mobility, career progression, and excellence in the european research area1. International migration, 43(5), (Web Link)

[4] What do postdocs need to succeed? A survey of current standing and future directions for Australian researchers
Margaret C. Hardy, Adrian Carter & Nikola Bowden
Palgrave Communications volume 2, (Web Link)

[5] M. Laniran, A. and J. Laniran, T. (2017) “Socio-cultural Career Progression Barriers for Women in Academics: A Case of the Federal College of Education (Special) Oyo, Nigeria”, Asian Research Journal of Arts & Social Sciences, 2(2), (Web Link)

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