Latest Research News on Diptera : March – 2020

DIPTERA AS PARASITOIDS

Parasitoids in the insect order Diptera include an estimated 16,000 species, or approximately 20% of the total number of species with this life-style. Parasitoids in this order are exceedingly diverse in both their habits and evolutionary origins, which makes them an underutilized but highly suitable group for quantitative studies of character convergence and adaptive radiation.[1]

Factors affecting decomposition and Diptera colonization

Understanding the process of corpse decomposition is basic to establishing the postmortem interval (PMI) in any death investigation even using insect evidence. The sequence of postmortem changes in soft tissues usually gives an idea of how long an individual has been dead [2]

Midges: Chironomidae and Related Diptera

Among insects, the chitinous larval remains of the order Diptera (true flies) are most abundant in lake sediments, and thus have proven to be especially useful in palaeoenviron-mental studies. Within this large and diverse group, however, remains of the Chironomidae (non-biting midges) greatly exceed the remains of all other Diptera in abundance. [3]

Species Composition and Diurnal Activity Rhythm of Tabanids (Diptera: Tabanidae) at the Ivindo National Park and Its Environs

An entomological prospection to show the species composition and diurnal activity of tabanids was carried out using 15 Vavoua traps, during the rainy season (25th Sept-5th Oct and 21st Oct-9th Nov 2018), in the secondary forest [Ivindo National Park (INP)] and Village-Town sites in and around the biosphere reserve Ipassa-IRET Makokou in Gabon. [4]

Comparative Toxicity Effect of Some Plant Extracts against Larvae of Anopheline (Diptera: Culicidae) in the North Eastern Nigeria

Owing to the adverse effect of synthetic pesticides, there has been increasing need to search for natural and environment friendly pesticides of plant origin as agents for control of vector of mosquito-borne diseases. [5]

Reference

[1] Feener Jr, D.H. and Brown, B.V., 1997. Diptera as parasitoids. Annual review of entomology42(1), pp.73-97.

[2] Campobasso, C.P., Di Vella, G. and Introna, F., 2001. Factors affecting decomposition and Diptera colonization. Forensic science international120(1-2), pp.18-27.

[3] Walker, I.R., 2001. Midges: Chironomidae and related diptera. In Tracking environmental change using lake sediments (pp. 43-66). Springer, Dordrecht.

[4] Joseph-Marie, A. O., Lendzele, S. S., Roland, Z. K. C., Franck, M., Aubin, K. A., Mintsa, R., Lydie, A.-Y. G., Bertrand, M. and Mavoungou, J. F. (2019) “Species Composition and Diurnal Activity Rhythm of Tabanids (Diptera: Tabanidae) at the Ivindo National Park and Its Environs”, Asian Journal of Research in Zoology, 2(2), pp. 1-7. doi: 10.9734/ajriz/2019/v2i230062.

[5] Naphtali, R. S., Ngwamah, J. S., Shitta, K. B., Atimi, A. and Kadala, E. (2018) “Comparative Toxicity Effect of Some Plant Extracts against Larvae of Anopheline (Diptera: Culicidae) in the North Eastern Nigeria”, Asian Journal of Research in Zoology, 1(2), pp. 1-9. doi: 10.9734/ajriz/2018/v1i229679.

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