Latest Research on Coronary Heart Disease: Jan – 2020

Fetal origins of coronary heart disease

The fetal origins hypothesis states that fetal undernutrition in middle to late gestation, which results in disproportionate fetal growth, programmes later coronary heart condition . Animal studies have shown that undernutrition before birth programmes persisting changes during a range of metabolic, physiological, and structural parameters. Studies in humans have shown that men and ladies whose birth weights were at the lower end of the traditional range, who were thin or short at birth, or who were small in reference to placental size have increased rates of coronary heart condition . We are starting to understand something of the mechanisms underlying these associations. [1]

Coronary heart disease in seven countries.

In a world cooperative study on the epidemiology of coronary heart condition teams examined 12, 770 men 40 to 59 years old in Finland, Greece, Italy, Japan, Netherlands , the us and Jugoslavia, who were re-examined 5 years later.

In the us of a complete of 125 deaths during the 5 years 62 were thanks to coronary heart condition , in Finland 38 of 111, within the Netherlands 16 of fifty , and altogether other groups only about 1 in 8. Within countries there have been no significant differences in incidence of the disorder between regions except in rural Finland where the east had significantly quite the west. [2]

Estrogen and Coronary Heart Disease in Women

We review herein the evidence that estrogen is protective against the event of disorder in women. To our knowledge, no studies in women have checked out endogenous estrogen levels as predictors of disorder . Studies of surrogate measures of endogenous estrogen like parity, age at menarche, and age at menopause have provided inconsistent results. Current use of oral contraceptives increases risk in older women who smoke cigarettes, but most studies of past use show no increased risk. Most, but not all, studies of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women show around a 50% reduction in risk of a coronary event in women using unopposed oral estrogen. [3]

Body mass index and weight change since 20 years of age and risk of coronary heart disease among Japanese: the Japan Public Health Center-Based Study

Background: Obesity and weight gain are related to increased risk of coronary heart condition in Western countries. However, their impact isn’t well elucidated in Asia, where body mass index (BMI) levels are generally less than in Western countries. We examined associations of BMI (kg/m2) and weight change with risk of coronary heart condition in Japanese people. [4]

Knowledge of Coronary Heart Disease and Practices on Detection and Management of Its Risk Factors among Primary Health Care Workers in Sokoto, Nigeria

Introduction: Hitherto considered to be exclusive to the developed countries, the burden of coronary heart condition (CHD) is now high and continues to rise within the developing countries. This has been attributed to the increasing prevalence of its risk factors, linked to trends in urbanization and changes in lifestyle. This study aimed to assess the knowledge of CHD and practices regarding detection and management of its risk factors among primary healthcare workers in Sokoto, Nigeria. [5]

Reference

[1] Barker, D.J., 1995. Fetal origins of coronary heart disease. Bmj, 311(6998), (Web Link)

[2] Keys, A., 1970. Coronary heart disease in seven countries. Circulation, 41(1), (Web Link)

[3] Barrett-Connor, E. and Bush, T.L., 1991. Estrogen and coronary heart disease in women. Jama, 265(14), (Web Link)

[4] Body mass index and weight change since 20 years of age and risk of coronary heart disease among Japanese: the Japan Public Health Center-Based Study
C L Chei, H Iso, K Yamagishi, M Inoue & S Tsugane for the JPHC Study Group
International Journal of Obesity volume 32, (Web Link)

[5] Awosan, K. J., Sabir, A. A., Ibrahim, M. T. O., Ibrahim, T., Bello-Baura, M. and Ibrahim, Z. (2017) “Knowledge of Coronary Heart Disease and Practices on Detection and Management of Its Risk Factors among Primary Health Care Workers in Sokoto, Nigeria”, Journal of Advances in Medicine and Medical Research, 24(7), (Web Link)

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