Latest Research News on Hippophae Rhamnoides Research: Sep – 2019

Changes in Antioxidant Effects and Their Relationship to Phytonutrients in Fruits of Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) during Maturation

Different fractions of ocean buckthorn fruits were investigated for inhibitor activity and its relationship to completely different phytonutrients. capability to scavenge radicals of the crude extract, just like the phenoplast and ascorbate extracts, shriveled considerably with inflated maturation. The changes were powerfully correlate with the content of total phenolics and antioxidant. inhibitor capability of the oleophilic extract inflated considerably and corresponded to the rise in total carotenoids. The phenoplast fractions created a serious contribution to the entire inhibitor capability because of the high content of total phenolics. [1]

Anti-oxidant and immunomodulatory properties of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)—an in vitro study

This study was designed to see the anti-oxidant and immunomodulatory properties of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) victimization lymphocytes as a model system. Chromium(VI) as salt was wont to induce aerophilous injury. the assembly of free radicals by atomic number 24 and also the ability of alcoholic leaf and fruit extracts of seabuckthorn to inhibit the aerophilous injury induced  by chromium was investigated. Addition of atomic number 24 (10 μg/ml) to the cells resulted in increased toxicity, apoptosis, radical production and attenuated glutathione (reduced) levels. atomic number 24 conjointly caused a major inhibition of white blood cell proliferation induced  by each lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A. [2]

Quality Components of Sea Buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) Varieties

The sensory quality and chemical constituents of juices from seven ocean buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides L.) varieties were studied in 2 consecutive seasons. The juices were typically delineate as bitter and astringent, with low sweetness and fruity flavor. The variations in sensory quality furthermore as in chemical composition between samples and years were important (p < zero.05) in most parameters studied. The Chuiskaya selection was delineate because the sweetest, with the strongest fruity flavor, whereas the varieties Avgustinka, Botanicheskaya, Trofimovskaya, and Raisa were the sourest and most astringent. Total sugar (fructose and glucose) varied from one.9 to 7.1 g/100 metric capacity unit in juice, total acid (malic and quinic acids) from three.1 to 5.1 g/100 mL, ascorbic acid from twenty nine to 176 mg/100 metric capacity unit, and pulp oil from zero.7 to 3.6%. The soluble solids were between seven.4 and 12.6, the pH scale between a pair of.7 and 2.9, and also the titrable acidity between a pair of.0 and 3.7. [3]

Hippophae rhamnoides as novel phytogenic feed additive for broiler chickens at high altitude cold desert

Extremes of climate and hypobaric drive cause poor growth performance in broiler chickens at high altitude. this study examined the potential of Hippophae rhamnoides extract as phytogenic feed additive for broilers reared at 3500 m on top of mean water level (MSL). Higher content of phytomolecules were recorded throughout characterization of the extract. Immunomodulatory activity of extract was ascertained in chicken lymphocytes through in-vitro studies. [4]

Effects of Hippophae rhamnoides L. Leaf and Marc Extract with Reduced Tannin Concentration on the Health and Growth Parameters of Newborn Calves

Aim: to check the consequences of orally administered mixture of Hippophae rhamnoides leaf and brandy extracts (HLM) on health parameters of newborn calves.

Study Design: ranging from birth day zero (D0) until day fifteen (D15) the extract of HLM was given orally to newborn calves before feeding them milk at AN enlarged dose from 5 to eight ml/calf/ double each day  for prevention of nutritionary looseness of the bowels. The calves were clinically examined and weighed. organic chemistry and morphological analyses of blood were determined.

Place and length of Study: Clinical institute, college of medical specialty and therefore the Institute of husbandry at Latvia University of Agriculture, Jelgava, Latvia; inside one year. [5]

Reference

[1] Gao, X., Ohlander, M., Jeppsson, N., Björk, L. and Trajkovski, V., 2000. Changes in antioxidant effects and their relationship to phytonutrients in fruits of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) during maturation. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 48(5), (Web Link)

[2] Geetha, S., Ram, M.S., Singh, V., Ilavazhagan, G. and Sawhney, R.C., 2002. Anti-oxidant and immunomodulatory properties of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)—an in vitro study. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 79(3), (Web Link)

[3] Tiitinen, K.M., Hakala, M.A. and Kallio, H.P., 2005. Quality components of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) varieties. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53(5), (Web Link)

[4] Hippophae rhamnoides as novel phytogenic feed additive for broiler chickens at high altitude cold desert
Sahil Kalia, Vijay K. Bharti, Arup Giri, Bhuvnesh Kumar, Achin Arora & S. S. Balaje
Scientific Reportsvolume 8, Article number: 5954 (2018) (Web Link)

[5] Liepa, L., Zolnere, E., Dūrītis, I., Krasnova, I. and Segliņa, D. (2018) “Effects of Hippophae rhamnoides L. Leaf and Marc Extract with Reduced Tannin Concentration on the Health and Growth Parameters of Newborn Calves”, European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 22(1), (Web Link)

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